CIFNAL Speaker Series

Launched in 2022, CIFNAL's Engaging Francophone Partners Working Group developed its 'Speaker Series,' designed to connect CIFNAL members and interested parties with vendors, librarians, scholars, and bibliographers in the area of French and Francophone studies. Videos from each talk are available below.

  • Quinn Dombrowski

Corpus Hebdo: Building Infrastructure for Multilingual Digital Humanities
May 20, 2022, | Watch here.

 

  • Charlotte Denoël

Preserving and Disseminating Medieval French Manuscript Heritage: Current Research Programs and Future Perspectives at the Bibliothèque national de France

June 10, 2022, | Watch here.

 

  • Clovis Gladstone
    Computational Approaches to Textual Scholarship: the ARTFL Project's French Digital Collections
    February 4, 2022 | Watch here.
     
  • M. Stephanie Chancy
    Preserving Cultural and Historical Patrimony: dLOC Partnerships and Collaborations in Haiti
    February 25, 2022 | Watch here.
     
  • Darlene Hull (Libros de Barlovento)
    Plein de Défis: a Book Vendor's Experience Acquiring Library Materials from Haiti
    March 4, 2022 | Watch here.
     
  • Jérémie Roche (CAIRN), Julie Therizols (OpenEdition), and Emilie Chouinard (Erudit)
    The Future of Electronic Publishing in France and Francophone Canada
    March 28, 2022 | Watch here.
     
  • Nathan H. Dize
    Translating Haiti in the Archives of Predominantly White Institutions and Historically Black Colleges and Universities
    April 15, 2022 | Watch here.

Videos will be added as they become available.

Event Highlight

New Directions for Libraries, Scholars, and Partnerships: and International Symposium

Friday, October 13, 2017
Frankfurt, Germany

More Event Information

All CIFNAL events (past and future)

Featured: Bibliothèque Bleue

CIFNAL is collaborating with the University of Chicago to add text-searching and analysis capabilities to Bibliothèque Bleue, a collection of fiction, popularized histories, and advice manuals printed in France in the 17th to the early 19th centuries.