The Global Dimensions of Scholarship and Research Libraries: A Forum on the Future

Reading Room, National Library, Beijing, China

Event Logistics

Date: 
Wednesday, December 05, 2012 to Thursday, December 06, 2012
Location: 
Duke University
Contact: 
James Simon - simon@crl.edu

Global Scholarship and Research Libraries: a Forum on the Future, was an invitational conference held at Duke University on December 5-6, 2012.  Supported by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and co-sponsored by Duke and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL), this two-day invitational event explore the connections between global scholarship and the collective ability of research libraries to support it.  The Forum also seeks to inject an international focus into the current conversations regarding the future of research libraries in the digital age. 

Given the widening emphasis on “globalization” on our campuses, and the technological developments that encourage more robust international collaboration, it is imperative that we sharpen the focus on access to information produced beyond the US in support of scholarship.  Woven into the forum will be the findings of two ongoing studies, one led by Charles Kurzman (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), and one led by Seteney Shami (Social Science Research Council), that examine trends in global scholarship in recent decades in American academia. Preliminary data from these projects will be presented at the forum.

The Forum drew from a variety of institutions and organizations: faculty, librarians, university administrators, association and scholarly society leaders, and project managers.  The Forum sought to produce a proposal for change and a blueprint for international collection development equal to the needs of global humanities and social science research, acknowledging both traditional and emerging research agendas (see proceedings and report, above in PDF and as a blog at Duke).

Further documentation: 

Conference agenda

Discussion papers and background reading

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