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On March 23-24 the "Truth, Justice, Memory: Documentary Evidence in the Digital Age" conference will take place at El Colegio de México, where the digital platform Repository of Documentation on Disappearances in Mexico (RDDM) will launch.

With issues dating back to the mid-1950s, the archive includes more than 440,000 pages from the Spanish-language daily newspaper.

CRL's newly appointed International Collections and Content Group (ICC) calls on the international library programs based at CRL to explore the challenges and opportunities in front of our communities and through that exploration, to consider new ways of working together. 

The RDDM Advisory Committee, composed of a broad cross-section of documentation, civil society, and human rights expertise, in addition to representatives of families of the disappeared, will strengthen the ability of the Repository to gather facts and information, which will enable researchers and policy makers to implement solutions to the humanitarian crisis regarding the more than 80,000 officially recognized disappeared persons in Mexico.

LARRP (Latin Americanist Research Resources Project) supported a collaborative project between the University of New Mexico and the Fideicomiso Archivo Plutarco Elías Calles and Fernando Torreblanca (FAPECFT) in Mexico City to digitize over 300,000 images from FAPECFT.  

The archival collections of nine historic women from Brazil have been made openly accessible by the Fundação Getulio Vargas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil with financial support from the Center for Research Libraries.

The International Collections and Content Group is a standing working group reporting to CSPC that will play a substantive role in shaping, implementing, and maintaining CRL’s approaches to the development and responsible stewardship of international collections.

The Latin American Materials Project (LAMP) supported the digitization of several newspapers and sets of archival material compiled by Memorias de la Patagonia Austral, a project of Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Bibliotecas y Archivos. 

CRL and East View Information Services have released the Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers, the third Open Access collection of titles digitized under the Global Press Archive (GPA) CRL Charter Alliance. This collection adds to the growing collection of Open Access material available through East View's Global Press Archive program.

The Latin American Materials Project (LAMP) has digitized two nineteenth century newspapers from Arequipa, Peru.  The newspapers are el Republicano (1825-1855) and la Bolsa (1884-1910).

The MacArthur Foundation awards grants to CRL and institutional partners in Mexico to provide support for a multistage initiative to promote the ability of memory institutions and other actors to secure and preserve documentation vital to civil society in Mexico.

CRL has numerous online resources available to researchers and scholars working remotely.

Thousands of architectural photos of Havana's historic central district are now accessible openly, thanks to funding from LAMP.

CRL has been awarded a planning grant from the MacArthur Foundation to develop an operable strategy for preserving recent Mexican human rights documentation.

CRL's commitment to Open Access investment in digitization now includes more than 1.2 million pages of Latin American newspapers available worldwide via CRL’s Digital Delivery System.

The Global Press Archive Charter Alliance will digitize and make available to all CRL member institutions 4.5 million pages of recent international newspaper content, with a significant portion of material to be made available in Open Access.

The Mexican Intelligence Digital Archives (MIDAS) contains files from the archives of Mexico’s two principal security services: the Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) and the Dirección General de Investigaciones Políticas y Sociales (DGIPS).

CRL supports research and teaching through digitization of timely, critical primary resources for scholars at CRL member institutions. 

CRL's premiere collection of executive branch serial documents issued by Brazil’s government is now fully searchable and downloadable.

CRL's new focus on digitization of Latin American materials has begun to expose a wealth of resources for cultural and political studies.