LLMC Online Viewer Recently Enhanced

New LLMC document viewer

Friday, April 19, 2019
Contact: 
Judy Alspach - jalspach@crl.edu

LLMC (Law Library Microform Consortium) has recently implemented a new online viewer to support intuitive browsing and navigation of the millions of historical legal publications at the document level. The new image viewer enhancements include:

  • full-volume display upon retrieval so that users can scroll through the document as a multipage pdf;
  • enhanced navigation within documents, including page-level metadata as as hyperlinked bookmarks and the ability to view image thumbnails;
  • improved search features within documents displaying search results in context

A brief overview of the enhancements is outlined in this LLMC tutorial video. Please send an email to llmc@llmc-digital.org or call 651-217-8116 if you have additional questions or would like to schedule a training webinar with LLMC's Content Manager, Kurt Meyer.

CRL and LLMC work together to identify, preserve, and provide digital access to important, at-risk, primary legal and government publications from U.S. and other national jurisdictions. The long-running partnership leverages the membership and resources of the two organizations to digitize and make accessible material identified by the partnership as strategic priorities and preserve digitized print collections in secure storage, with retention commitments disclosed in the PAPR registry.

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