Text/Data Mining Webinar: Supporting Researcher Needs

Event Logistics

Date: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Time: 
2:00–3:00 p.m. Central Time
Location: 
CRL
Contact: 
Virginia Kerr - vkerr@crl.edu

Registrations for this event are now closed.

This webinar will explore the complex needs and interests of scholars engaged in text and data mining (TDM), and how librarians can meet those needs. What kinds of knowledge and skills are necessary to effectively support this rapidly growing type of research? How can researchers, eager to gain access to large bodies of primary text and data, benefit from library perspectives on the rights of content providers, available tools, and appropriate methodologies? Listen and engage as a librarian and a TDM pioneer share their experiences.

Speakers will include:

  • Robert Scott, head of the Digital Humanities Center at Columbia University Libraries
  • Kalev Leetaru, currently the Yahoo! Fellow in Residence of International Values, Communications Technology & the Global Internet at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, Georgetown University


This will be the third CRL webinar to explore issues surrounding TDM. The first examined some of the challenges envisioned by librarians and publishers; in the  second  journal publishers discussed licensing and technical solutions under development.

CRL hosts webinars throughout the year. More information on our webinar schedule can be found in the Membership section.

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